The Liberty Bell and Leviticus 25: 10


On July 8, 1776, the Liberty Bell rang from the tower of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, summoning citizens to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Colonel John Nixon  (Lieutenant-Colonel in the Third Battalion of Associators) from the steps of the State House.

10And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof: it shall be a jubile unto you; and ye shall return every man unto his possession, and ye shall return every man unto his family.

The bell, which was adopted as a symbol of freedom by the abolitionist movement, as it was used as a frontispiece to an 1837 edition of Liberty, published by the New York Anti-Slavery Society. is inscribed on the bottom with scripture from the book of Leviticus of God’s Word.  It reads “Proclaim liberty throughout the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.” The words inscribed were quoted from the tenth verse of the 25th Chapter of Leviticus, of the King James version of the Holy Bible. The entire verse proclaims: 10And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof: it shall be a jubile unto you; and ye shall return every man unto his possession, and ye shall return every man unto his family.

While enjoying the holiday commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, it is appropriate to remember that the very first call to liberty from the tyranny of the British crown rang from a bell inscribed with the freedom of spirit that comes with adhering to God’s righteousness. On July 4, 1776, the signers of the Declaration of Independence. “with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence” mutually pledged to each other their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

Source(s):

Declaration of Independence and The Liberty Bell/ U.S. History dot org

Archives/ Penn University

Leviticus 25: 10/ KJV, Holy Bible/ Bible Hub

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